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20121111
20121111
STATION
CNN 4
CNNW 4
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 6:00am EST
the saudis are providing virtually no assistance today to egypt. think of what is going on in jordan and egypt today. these two countries, each of whom borders the world's most resource-rich, energy-rich part of the world, today, are undergoing a rather draconian restrictions on the uses of energy. the lights are out in cairo every night at 10:00 and jordan has-rations. the live virtually right next door to saudi arabia. who are the three leaders who deserve special attention, mr. president? first, let's start with the prime minister of israel. if he gets another term as prime minister, he will be with you throughout your presidency. locked at the hip or perhaps another part of your anatomy. [laughter] your interests state to state our confidence and complementary. you don't have to love each other but you have to out -- but you have a big agenda with each other, that requires you to work together. it is very important for mr. netanyahu to work together with few. you are the great power and israel is the small power. you have a role to play in building a new relationship with him as
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 2:00am EST
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:15am EST
and his entourage and his inner circle, thought that syria might weather the arab storm that had hit egypt and tunisia, yemen, bahrain and libya. he gave an interview in january to a good friends of mine, jay sol low moan, with "the wall street journal" where he said syria was immune from the arab spring. some of the mouthpieces for the regime in february and march were publishing articles in syrian forums that were supportive of the protesters in egypt and tunisia, and there was a contrast made that they authoritarian leaders who were lackeys of the united states and israel, were out of touch with the youth ask the populations in their countries, whereas the president of syria was a young 45 at the time. he was a computer nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar
PBS
Nov 10, 2012 4:00pm PST
and joseph load up the donkey and hustle their son down to egypt as the bloody massacre proceeds. the sculptor captures the horror of this event with a skill unprecedented in its day. pisano's 400 intricately sculpted figures all weave a complex theological ideal. this provides a symbolic foundation designed to legitimize and reinforce the gospel message the priests read from the lectern crowning the pulpit. in the middle ages, you couldn't even enter the church until you were baptized. that's why baptisteries like pisa's were free-standing buildings adjacent to the church. the interior is simple and spacious. a statue of john, the first baptist, the man who baptized christ, seems to say, "welcome to my baptistery." the finely crafted font is plenty big for baptizing adults by immersion, medieval-style. the highlight here for most is the remarkable acoustics, resulting in echoes long enough to let you sing three-part harmony... solo. [ singing harmonizes with echoes ] [ singing echoes ]
PBS
Nov 11, 2012 10:00am PST
a new course. there's a freshness about him. >>> in egypt, the new coptic pope urged coptic christians to become more active in public and political life. pope tawadros ii also voiced his opposition to calls from some islamist leaders for a constitution heavily based on sharia law. the new pope was chosen last sunday. according to tradition, his name along with those of two others, were written on pieces of paper and put into a jar. a blindfolded child then randomly selected the name of the man who would lead the coptic church. >>> now more on this week's presidential election. i'm joined by kim lawton, managing editor of this program, kevin eckstrom, editor of religion news service and rachel zoll, national religion writer for the associated press, who's with us from new york. welcome to you all. kim, underneath all the data, do you see a message? >> well, there's definitely a message for, i think, the republican party and the religious right that those old faith-based coalitions that won elections aren't winning those elections any more. i mean, you had evangelicals did an unpreceden
CNN
Nov 10, 2012 6:00pm PST
that happening in tunisia, in egypt, in libya. have you encouraged that? do you encourage the people of those countries to rise up and to protest? >> you see, for the people to rise up or to start a movement it's their on prerogative. we do not meddle or interfere in that. we believe everywhere justice respect freedom and friendship must prevail. >> do you believe fundamentally in a man or a woman's right to protest? >> yes. it depends on the laws of any nation. all nations' laws are not equal. they differ. in most countries in one way or another this is allowed under the laws. but fundamentally, i do agree, certainly people must be allowed to express their own opinions freely. freedom is part of the essential rights of all nations. >> if that is -- >> no one has the right to take that away. >> if that is the case, why has the daughter of the former president of iran, why has she been imprisoned for protesting against your regime? >> in iran, there's only one regime so perhaps they're protesting against that. and in iran the judicial branch is not under the power of the government, they have
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 4:45pm EST
ambassadors from north korea to the middle east including egypt. a lot of arms trade in financial transaction. and overall, bell bought a lot of information, but melanie n.j. both pointed out that the number of elite his tutor 3,000. there is no analogous situation. it is just a group that have been brought in. and it's them against everybody else. >> thank you. >> i think it would be interesting, over here, the general way in which you share the stories. somehow a great deal of apprehension. if you could just elaborate the process by which you went to miss some of the instances by wish you secured the stories which ellis. >> well, thank you. one of the things i learned early on, and is not surprising is that talking about these stories is very difficult for many north koreans. it is painful to relive these memories. and i tried to do it in a slow way to allow them to take the lead rather than be, you know, kind of get out my wall street journal aggressive reporting skills. by one of the aspects of my book that is, i think, different from other things that have been written about north korea
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 7:00am EST
of letting the democracy happen what happened in egypt, libya, democratic elections. they're going to have to deal with their own almost civil war like we had to make sure that they get the government they want and not necessarily our outcome can't just be we can establish a government that's friendly to us. it has to be the people and sometimes it takes generations for these governments to really take hold and be by the people. host: thanks for the call. guest: that's a fair point. i wouldn't say that the problem in afghanistan is the united states is opposed to democracy per say. what i would say is that the united states and the rest of the international community and after gans themselves have a long way to go before they have something that looks like a credible and effective democracy takes root. and before we get there there is the prospect that the country could revert back to if not civil war but extensive conflict throughout the country, extreme violence and that is of concern to the united states. and the reason it's of concern is not simply a humanitarian one or to put who we w
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)